IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION and INDICATION for ABILIFY:
U.S. FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION, including Boxed WARNINGS, and Medication Guide.

Elderly people with psychosis related to dementia (for example, an inability to perform daily activities as a result of increased memory loss), treated with antipsychotic medicines including ABILIFY®(aripiprazole), are at an increased risk of death compared to placebo. ABILIFY is not approved for the treatment of people with dementia-related psychosis. See More Safety Information

INDICATION: ABILIFY (aripiprazole) is used for the treatment of manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in adults and in pediatric patients 10 to 17 years of age. It can be used either by itself or as an add-on treatment to lithium or valproate.

Real Patient Stories

The personal stories featured here are from people who have been diagnosed with bipolar I disorder and are taking ABILIFY (aripiprazole). Their firsthand accounts of how ABILIFY has helped them manage their manic symptoms may help you to understand the nature of bipolar I disorder and ABILIFY as a treatment option.

Individual results may vary.

Anne AnneAnne

Anne’s Story

Anne grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina. She loved outdoor activities, especially swimming, and was a member of her high school swim team.
Anne’s father had been diagnosed with bipolar I disorder (then called manic depression), and he was hospitalized for some time as a result of his condition.

College Life
In college, Anne recalls "self-medicating a lot with alcohol," because she couldn't sleep at night. Anne experienced racing thoughts and couldn't concentrate on her schoolwork. At the time, Anne didn't realize she was beginning to experience manic episodes of bipolar I disorder.

At the time, Anne didn't realize she was beginning to
experience manic episodes of bipolar I disorder.

Anne's Symptoms
Anne describes her life as “very chaotic.” She would experience periods of euphoria, where she felt she could do just about anything. Other times she was easily irritated, talked too much, and had difficulty getting along with co-workers or friends. “I was losing jobs because of having a bad attitude at work,” she remembers. Anne notes that the manic episodes of bipolar I disorder typically began the same way—sleepless nights followed by periods of risky behavior such as spending too much money or alcohol abuse, and thoughts of suicide.

Getting Diagnosed
After seeing several therapists, Anne remained frustrated and confused about her symptoms. She was 31 years old, and by that point her manic symptoms of bipolar I disorder had increased. Finally, Anne turned to a family physician, who diagnosed her manic episodes of bipolar I disorder.

Finally, Anne turned to a family physician, who diagnosed her manic episodes of bipolar I disorder.

Discovering ABILIFY
Anne tried a number of medications, but she still experienced symptoms of mania. In 2003, Anne’s doctor talked to her about a medication called
ABILIFY (aripiprazole) and prescribed it for her.

About Taking ABILIFY
ABILIFY helped improve her manic symptoms of bipolar I disorder. Anne goes out with friends and enjoys spending time with her family. Anne also understands the importance of taking her medication as prescribed and having regular talks with her doctor about her bipolar I disorder.

Anne volunteered to share her experience and has not been paid by the makers of ABILIFY. If you have further questions about ABILIFY, please talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. While these patients are not representative of every patient taking ABILIFY, their stories suggest how it may work for some people. Individual results may vary.

Gwen Gwen

Gwen’s Story

Gwen has a knack for detail, an eye for natural beauty, and a passion for photography. She also has manic episodes of bipolar I disorder.

Gwen’s Symptoms
Gwen experienced several severe mood swings over the course of a year. During her manic episodes, Gwen had excessive energy, was irritable, didn’t need as much sleep, and had difficulty concentrating at work. Her behavior alienated her from her co-workers. Gwen remembers cleaning excessively, writing for hours on end, and spending money she didn’t have.

"I had a heightened sense of energy when I was in that
manic episode, and 2 hours of sleep was the max for me."

Getting a Diagnosis
A doctor who was treating Gwen for another issue recommended that she consult a psychiatrist. That afternoon, Gwen was diagnosed with manic episodes of bipolar I disorder. She eventually learned to recognize the symptoms of mania, but often had no idea she was in a manic episode.

About Taking ABILIFY
During a stay in the hospital, a healthcare professional suggested that Gwen
try ABILIFY (aripiprazole). Within several days, Gwen began to experience improvement in her symptoms of mania. She knows that taking ABILIFY as prescribed is important, and she works hard not to miss a dose.

Staying Healthy
Gwen doesn’t rely on ABILIFY alone. The support of her mother and sister, co-workers, and friends helps her manage the manic symptoms of bipolar I disorder. She depends on her healthcare professional for guidance, and on a nurse practitioner for help with staying on ABILIFY. Gwen realizes that lifestyle changes and hobbies support stability. Gwen’s not big on exercise, but she says, “Give me a nice stroll somewhere and my camera, and I’m very happy.

"I’m very grateful for what ABILIFY has been able to do for me."

Gwen volunteered to share her experience and has not been paid by the makers of ABILIFY. If you have further questions about ABILIFY, please talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. While these patients are not representative of every patient taking ABILIFY, their stories suggest how it may work for some people. Individual results may vary.

Important Safety Information: Uncontrollable movements of face, tongue, or other parts of body may be signs of a serious condition called tardive dyskinesia (TD). TD may not go away, even if you stop taking ABILIFY (aripiprazole). TD may also start after you stop taking ABILIFY.

See More Safety Information
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